Posts categorized "Live 9" Feed

How to Send a MIDI Program Change to Absynth in Ableton Live

Absynth-program-change
 
(Click Image to Enlarge)

Absynth’s “Program List” is a great way to organize your favorite presets for studio or performance work. You can also use it as a list of MIDI program changes. In this article I illustrate how this works with step-by-step instructions on how to to use MIDI program change in Ableton Live to change presets in Native Instruments Absynth.

  1. Click the Browser tab Absynth has a featured called “Program Lists”. To access this feature, click on the “Browser” tab.
  2. Click “Programs” if it’s not lit in green. This exposes the Program List. If the “On” button is lit, Absynth listens for MIDI program changes.
  3. Drag sounds you would like in your preset change list to the “Program List”
  4. Create some dummy clips (a clip with no notes) by double clicking in a clip slot for the device holding Absynth.
  5. In the “Notes” section of the device interface, use the bottom field to set the program number. In the example, the clip in focus is set to a value of “Pgm 3” which will select the third preset in the list. You can set a different progam number for each clip.

Of course this technique will work with any VST or hardware synth that can receive a MIDI patch change.

One use case for a live situation is to use a grid controller like a Launchpad or APC 40 to launch the dummy clips to quickly change patches. You could load up 8 of your favorite synths (or 8 instances of absynth), then use scene launches to tee up the patches per scene. For example, if you use used one scene per song in a live situation, you could launch the scene, then select each track (or set of tracks to arm and layer the synths as the song progressed. When you are ready for song 2, launch scene 2 and all the patches will be teed up. 

The advantage that instead of having to load a new set per song, or have a lot of instances of a synth, you simply use the same synths instances for each song and change the presets in play for each song.

Mark Mosher
http://www.markmoshermusic.com
http://www.aiwinter.net
http://bouldersynth.com (meetup)


New Mindmap: What’s New In Ableton Live 9.1

I published a new Mindmap on “What’s New in Ableton Live 9.1”. Even though this is a point release there are quite a few new features. Dual monitor support and lots of Push updates in this release.

View the Mindmap here. You may also want to check out my “What’s New in Ableton Live 9” mindmap which has been viewed over 10,000 times to date.


Create your own mind maps at MindMeister

Mind Maps


View Mindmap of What's New in Ableton Live 9

image

Every month I host the Boulder Synthesizer Meetup which is the 2nd Tuesday of every month. This month I delivered a “What’s New in Live 9” talk along with Darwin Grosse from Cycling ‘74. To prep for the meetup, I dug through the Ableton web site and Live 9 manual and then documented the new features into a Mindmap. The map also includes a list of all the Max for Live "essentials" devices.

Having all this on one page was quite handy so I posted an interactive slideshow version for you here and also embedded the map below.


Create your own mind maps at MindMeister.

Mark Mosher
Boulder, CO

 www.MarkMosherMusic.com <-- Support my art and research through album buys and donations

Mind Maps


Listen to "Falling" Sound Design Experiment with Live 9 + Max for Live Convolution Reverb Pro Using IR Made with Pitch-to-MIDI Absynth Patch

image

I was experimenting with Live 9’s new pitch-to-MIDI and Max for Live Convolution Reverb Pro a few days back and come up with this idea.

 

 

Here is the process I followed.

  1. I started with a vocal sample by the wonderful artist Snowflake (CC-BY-NC faccmixter.org/files/snowflake/37827). BTW I remixed one of her tracks last year – click here to give it a listen.
  2. Use “Convert Melody to New MIDI Track” to convert her Melody to MIDI. This creates a new MIDI track with an Ableton instrument.
  3. Swap the Ableton instrument on the MIDI track with Absynth 5.  You could of course stick with Ableton instruments here. I used a dissonant bell preset with major reverb decay.
  4. Create an audio clip from the Absynth patch. You could resample it or  freeze the track,  insert a new audio track and drag the frozen clip to the new audio track to create an audioclip.
  5. Insert the Max for Live Convolution Reverb Pro on the original vocal track.
  6. Apply the Absynth sample as the Impulse Response file for the Convolution Reverb by dragging the audio clip from step #4 and dropping it I on the waveform display of the Max for Live device.
  7. Play the original sample through the Convolution Reverb

What’s great about this process is since the Impulse Response was derived from pitch-to-MIDI of the original sample, the resultant reverb follows the phrasing of the original vocal track – but of course is also slewed and torqued in an organic way by using the Absynth patch with more sustain and bigger reverb and space. I also love how this creates new harmonics.

I also want to point out that while each of these discrete processes are available in separate tools already, having this all integrated in Live 9 with Max for Live makes for a rapid and creative sound design workflow. It’s taken me way longer to explain it her than id did to think this up and execute the idea (which only took about 5 minutes).

It’s also worth mentioning you don’t need to be a programmer to use Max for Live as an artist. Just drag in the devices that come with Max for Live essentials and use them like any native live device.

Links:

Mark Mosher
Synthesist, Composer, Performer
Boulder, CO
Artist Site & Album Downloads: www.markmoshermusic.com


Live 9 + M4L Tips: Modulating Buffer Shuffler 2.0 Patterns with LFO

I’ve really been enjoying the new and refreshed Max for Live devices in Live 9.  Buffer Shuffler 2.0 is really great. Here is a fun tip.

1) Create a variety of patterns

2) To cycle through the patterns, drop in the LFO M4L device. Click the map button and then click on one of the pattern numbers. Now the LFO will modulate the pattern being applied.

You can use the LFO “Offset” parameter to pick the lowest pattern that will be selected. The “Depth” parameter will determine the range allowing you to restrict the highest pattern selected. Experiment with LFO shapes and speeds.

Mark Mosher
Boulder, CO
If you want to learn how to support my art and music tech research visit - www.MarkMosherMusic.com


Photos form the Ableton Live 9, Max for Live and Push Premiere Event the University of Denver

I attended the Ableton Live 9, Max for Live and Push Premiere Event the University of Denver on Wednesday February 27th.

Ableton Certified Trainer and electronic artist Orville Kline joins Darwin Grosse from Cycling 74 for a unique performance and presentation covering the new features of Ableton Live 9, the potential of Max for Live and exploring creative approaches for composition and performance using Ableton's new hardware instrument Push.

Here is a flickr set from the event.