Check Out Reaktor 6 Blocks User Library + Waldorf Microwave Oscillator


There are already 30 user Blocks in the Reaktor 6 User Library - bam. Check out the user library here

A big thanks to Sandy Small for the Microwave Oscillator (with modulatable table index, table selector and more). This Block already has 800+ downloads.


Happy patching!


Mark Mosher <<< Artist Site <<< Podcast

Reaktor 6 First Impressions + Video of First Blocks Patch

Krell 001 mm b

Last year I picked up Reaktor 5 on sale for $99 bucks - normally $399. Well Reaktor 6 is here and Native Instruments dropped the price to $199 with the upgrade at $99. I went ahead and swung for the upgrade.

I have to say I  ended up NOT using Reaktor 5 much. "Goldilocks and the Three Bears" comes to mind as I was using it. Ensemble programming was a little too complex (I was too busy making music to put the time into learning the platform), and using other peoples super-polished ensembles just felt I was using someone else's dream synth.

Reaktor 6 introduces the notion of "Blocks" - which for me  - is just right.

Blocks is a new framework that turns REAKTOR 6 into a fully-equipped, rack-style modular synth. Over 30 Blocks – including oscillators, filters, effects, modulators, and sequencers – come with REAKTOR 6. Among these Blocks are components from acclaimed NI synths such as ROUNDS and MONARK – all you need to start creating elaborate modular synth patches.

Within minutes of firing up Reaktor 6 I was leveraging my sound design chops I used on other instruments to making new patches out of blocks. If you have a basic understanding of signal flow with modulars you'll have no trouble getting going. I watched a handful of videos from this very nice tutorial series on patching with blocks and looked at an example patch and was off to the races. In another words, I'm already actually using and creating with Reaktor 6 after having Reaktor 5 collect dust for a year.

The interface is quite straight forward. When you add blocks (which are standardized in height) they get bolted into your virtual rack in your "Panel" view.  You can drag them around in rows of rails. If you click the  "Panel | Structure" view a split view is created with your rack up top and the wiring down below allowing you to patch.

Krell 001 mm

The "Bento Box" blocks which come with it are nuts and bolts modules. A nice touch is Native Instruments included modularaized components of their Monark minimoog emulation and two effects processor from their Rounds instrument. The sound quality of modules is excellent. Also, As of this writing, there are already 30 blocks in the user library Of course blocks can integrate into existing Reaktor Ensembles. 

My First Patch

Here is a video Reaktor 6 of my first patch in action. My goal was to show how just a few modules with a few notes could create something rather sonically complex to show the potential of the system - and for those not familiar with modulars - the kind of sonic mayhem you can create. So please enjoy this simple but fun patch inspired - of course - by the Krell in the film Forbidden Planet.



Patch Notes

Krell 001 mm c

I'm using the Monark oscillator (now available in Block form) to frequency modulating a a factory Bento box oscillator. I've got an LFO modulating an LFO which modulates the pitch of Monark OSC + delay time of a Rounds Delay (also now available in Blocks form). If you are familiar at all with modular synthesis, you'll find Blocks to be very intuitive and inspiring - and much easier to make instruments from from than using only the techniques possible in Reaktor 5.

Bottom Line

I think this is a no-brainer upgrade for existing Reaktor users, especially if you want to get into modular patching. This is also a pretty great value at $199 for new users who want to dip their toe into the modular world and perhaps learn a platform for making instruments.Blocks are useful right away, plus are a nice entry point (perhaps a gateway drug) into the world of instrument building with Reaktor.

Mark Mosher <<< Artist Site <<< Podcast

Flight-Friendly Hardware Synth Rig Part 2 - Backing Into Your Synth Rig from the Pelican 1510 Case

Photo Aug 23, 1 44 27 PM

This is a follow-up to post "Flight-Friendly Hardware Synth Rig Part 1 - Switching to Hardware Rig for my Solo Set". 

Over the last 5 years or so I've had the opportunity to fly to festivals. It's always a challenge of course to get your gear from here to there.

One strategy I'd recommend is to back into your show rig from what will fit into the luggage you are going to travel with. Something to consider here is that you want to bring enough essential gear as carry-on so that you could perform your set even if your checked luggage doesn't make it with you to the venue. So a backpack and a case that will fit in the overhead bin are the way to go.

Pelican 1510 Carry On Case - $160

Photo Aug 23, 1 41 06 PM

It's important to get a tough case for the overhead bin in case you are asked to gate check the bag or end up on a regional jet where approved sizes won't fit. This has happened to me multiple times over the years. In this scenario they'll put the bag right into the cargo hold so you at least know your gear will make it to the destination with you.

My friend and amazing artist Dino J.A. Deanne ( who's done many tours turned me on to the Pelican 1510 Carry On Case. Here is Dino's post on cases.

  • Retractable extension handle
  • Strong polyurethane wheels with stainless steel bearings
  • Easy open Double Throw latches
  • Open cell core with solid wall design - strong, light weight
  • O-ring seal
  • Automatic Pressure Equalization Valve
  • Comfortable rubber over-molded top and side handles
  • Stainless steel hardware and padlock protectors
  • Pick N Pluck™ with convoluted lid foam
  • Personalized nameplate service available
  • Lifetime Guarantee of Excellence
  • INTERIOR (L x W x D) 19.75" x 11" x 7.6" (50.1 x 27.9 x 19.3 cm) 
  • EXTERIOR (L x W x D) 22" x 13.81" x 9" (55.9 x 35.1 x 22.9 cm) 

This case is just amazing. I ordered the version with the Pick N Pluck foam so I could customize the case for my desktop rig. The biggest challenge is deciding how you'll lay out your gear to fit. Here is my case from the inside out.

Photo Aug 23, 1 43 40 PM

Pick N Pluck comes in two sheets that lay on top of each other. Place your gear on the sheets and use chalk or toothpicks to mark  where you'll need to punch out the foam to fit your gear. Then just pull the little rectangles off. 

The picture above shows the bottom layer punched out to fit the Octatrack, Blofeld Desktop, and Mackie Mixer. Hang on to all those scraps as they com in handy. For example, I used Elmers Multi-Purpose Spray Adhesive to glue Pick N Place scraps to create one more layer of padding on the bottom of the case for the Octatrack. I also sprayed adhesive on q-tips and used it to glue the thin run of foam along the top and for other miscellaneous padding.

In this next photo, you can see I've placed the Octatrack and Blfoeld Desktop into the case. Note that there are slots cut out for the blofeld knobs. It looks a little precarious at this point but adding the next layer tightens things up. Also note that I have Elektron's Protective Lid PL-2 on top of the Octatrack. The lid is expensive at $59, but I consider it a  MUST BUY for Elektron users who take their instruments out of the studio. I'm also a fan of the Elektron ECC-2 soft-sided carry case (which includes the lid) if you just want a way to carry your Elektron unit around by itself locally.

 Photo Aug 23, 1 43 15 PM

In this next photo, you'll see I dropped in the next layer of Pick N Pluck foam and this time I glued some extra scraps to put tension on the top of the blofeld where there are no knobs or LEDs which also ensures that there is not pressure on the knobs. I also inserted the Mackie 402VLZ3.

Photo Aug 23, 1 41 48 PM

I then carved down into the foam so I could add an Akai Professional MPK Mini Mk2 to the rig.

Photo Aug 23, 1 41 36 PM

I used some scraps to put a layer over the drum pads so the lid wouldn't crush the joystick. 

Photo Aug 23, 1 41 30 PM

When you button the case up, nothing moves at all! 

If you really mess things up and need to start over, or you want a different configuration of padding for a different rig, you can buy replacement foam on Amazon.



There of course an incredible number of choices for backpacks. Ultimately, you just need something you dig that will fit all your gear and still fit under the seat in front of you. I used to use a North Face Surge and last year switched to a consumer backpack - the Osprey Ozone 46. While there are many fine choices in DJ backpacks, I prefer the consumer backpacks so I can use them for things other than toting musical gear. In other words, they are lighter when you are doing other things but it's up to you to add padding to fit most musical journeys.

Carry the essentials to pull off a show in this bag - plus items to keep you going during the travel day.

  1. My laptop and power supply (which I use for visuals)
  2. Essential audio and power cables for the rig
  3. Any recorders you need to document the show like a GoPro, Zoom H2N.
  4. Flashlight
  5. Spare batteries for gear
  6. Spare audio adapters
  7. Any perscription meds, pain relievers, allergy pills, Bandaids...
  8. Phone charger
  9. Square or payment reader
  10. A few copies of your CDs
  11. Business cards
  12. myPower ALL Plus MP3450i Battery to charge my phone and run the Octatrack if need be
  13. Snacks in case the flight gets delayed (happens all the time of course)
  14. Nalgene OTF Water Bottle with locking lid. You can open and close it with one hand. Even if you  kick it over on stage you won't soak your cables or rig. Fill it up on the other side of security for the odd chance that you get stuck on a tarmac somewhere.

Checked Bag

If it's a quick in-and-out show, you might be able to fit your change of clothes and toothbrush in the backpack. If not you'll need to check a bag. I also use the checked bag for:

  1. Backup cables for the rig
  2. I sometimes bring stands in this bag like the Roland SS-PC1 Laptop Table
  3. If I can spare the weight, a Furman AC-215A power conditioner
  4. A stereo Hum Eliminator
  5. Merchandise
  6. Sometimes LED lights like a Simppar 56
  7. Clothes

-------------------- << Artist Site and Podcast

Electro-Music Festival New York is September 11-13 - Listen to Live Stream

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Electro-Music Festival New York is next week. I can't make it this year but it looks like another great lineup.

I first went to this festival in 2010 and have been 4 times total. This festival was a life changer for me as I went just as I was starting out as a solo electronic music artist (after 13 years of gigging in a rock band). I met so many amazing people and saw so many inspiring performances!  If you want to know what it's like read my show report from 2010.

For more information visit

They are Live streaming the event. Listen here there is a chat room link top right on this page.

Mark Mosher

Flight-Friendly Hardware Synth Rig Part 1 - Switching to Hardware Rig for my Solo Set

In my last post "Part 1 - Mark Mosher Cinematic Electronic Live - Boulder Synthesizer Meetup August 11, 2015" I shared a video of a solo set I played at the Boulder Synthesizer Meetup earlier this month. For years now when I've played my solo sets I've used an Ableton controllerism rig on the audio side. Hot off the heels of the (no)poem tour where I had great luck using all hardware in a collaborate and improvisational context, the meetup gig was a test of using all hardware on the audio side and only using the computer for interactive visuals. The instant-on and quick setup of the all hardware rig was really great and allowed me to play a continuous set combining composed piece from my albums plus do improv.

At the meetup gig, I used a Blofeld keyboard.


I wanted to be able replicate that same gig for away gigs where I fly so I added an Akai MPK Mini MK2 to be paired with the Blofeld Desktop.


 Here is a sketch of my solo rig now.

Photo Aug 24, 8 21 17 AM

By having a home and away rig with the same technology I can develop more muscle memory for the rig and focus on a small set of instruments.

Note that if I happen to have the computer along for visuals, I can turn this into a hybrid rig and use the laptop to run Percussa MIDIBridge and run audio cubes as gestural controllers.

I'm currently testing the rig in hybrid mode and will add an iConnect MIDI interface soon so I can completely break the tether to the laptop if needed.

Coming up in Part 2 - Backing Into Your Synth Rig from the Pelican 1510 Case

Photo Aug 23, 1 44 27 PM

Part 1 - Mark Mosher Cinematic Electronic Live - Boulder Synthesizer Meetup August 11, 2015


This video is part 1 of a live cinematic electronica set I performed at the Boulder Synthesizer Meetup on August 11th 2015 at the Walnut room in Denver. In this video I'm performing both the music and the visuals. 


Part 1 - Mark Mosher Cinematic Electronic Live - Boulder Synthesizer Meetup August 11, 2015 from Mark Mosher on Vimeo.

Part 1 - Mark Mosher Cinematic Electronic Live - Boulder Syntheszier Meetup August 11, 2015 from Mark Mosher on Vimeo.

In part 1 I perform an extended version of "Gonna Rise Up" from the album Fear Cannot Save Us" For this piece, I was doing live arrangement on the Octatrack plus playing lead synth on the Waldorf Blofeld. The lead patch is an original patch from INIT using OSC2 & 3 for sync with mod wheel. The original lead patch on the album version was done with Zebra 2. To retain some of its character, I used Extreme Sample Convert to multi-sample the Zebra patch then import into the Blofeld for the source for Oscillator 1.

Rig Notes:
This set was performed only on Octatrack dynamic performance sampler with original field recordings and sonic elements from albums plus a Waldorf Blofled keyboard with original presets.

Recording Notes:
Live audio was recorded on a Zoom H2n fed by my sub-mix to house via Mackie 402VLZ3. Main footage is from a GoPro with secondary foot from my friend Chris Frain.

Visuals Notes:
The ONLY video source is from live camera input being run through layers of custom Resolume presets controlled by an Arturia Beatstep live.

Aug 11, 2015 Boulder Synthesizer Meetup: Custom Mobile Controllers with Langdon Crawford + Performing on Octatrack and Blofeld


I'm back from the (no)poem heartland tour which was great fun. I'll post more on the tour soon. 

Custom Mobile Controllers with Langdon Crawford

Meanwhile for you Denver/Boulder locals - I've cooked up another cool event for 317 strong member strong The Boulder Synthesizer Meetup. Come by tomorrow to see Langdon Crawford's talk. RSVP here

"Combining repurposed/recycled technology and low cost materials with digital synthesis, langsound (Langdon Crawford) has developed an expressive performance system for electronic music. Short musical excerpts will be used to demonstrate the controller/system. Slides and discussion will illuminate how and why it might be productive for others to think of using old mobile devices for music making."

Langdon C. Crawford is an artist and educator originally from the green mountains of Vermont. He has been developing performance/composition systems with electronics since 1999. Starting with guitars, effects and sequencers, he moved into computer music, eventually incorporating graphics and sensor controlled interaction. He has a masters of music technology from NYU. He currently teaches at FRCC and works as a freelancer based in Golden, CO.  When not teaching or traveling for work, you can find Langdon in and around the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.  More info and works can be seen at:

I'll Be Performing at Meetup

I've also super psyched to perform some new arrangements of material from my most recent cinematic electronica alien invasion album "Fear Cannot Save Us" performed on Octatrack and Blofeld.


I've worked up a really cool extended version of "Gonna Rise Up"! Here is the album version. I'll also be doing some improvs on Octatrack and Blofeld.

Note, you can pick up the 12 song album Fear Cannot Save Us for $7 over on Bandcamp. For behind-the-scenes on this album, check out my interview on Art + Music + Technology Podcast #23.