The Museum of Endangered Sounds

Museum-of-endangered-sounds

One of my daily reads is the Messy Ness Chick blog. She doesn't write about music typically, but it is quite wonderful and I highly recommend it. On type of article she posts is called "13 Things I Found on the Internet Today". 

In today's finds, she included The Museum of Endangered Sounds which is quite interesting so I thought I'd pass it along.  Here is the site link http://savethesounds.info/

The Museum Of Endangered Sounds is owned and operated by me, Brendan Chilcutt (handle: kidpeleus99@aol.com).

I launched the site in January of 2012 as a way to preserve the sounds made famous by my favorite old technologies and electronics equipment. For instance, the textured rattle and hum of a VHS tape being sucked into the womb of a 1983 JVC HR-7100 VCR. As you probably know, it's a wonderfully complex sound, subtle yet unfiltered. But, as streaming playback becomes more common in the US, and as people in developing nations like Canada and the UK get brought up to DVD players, it's likely that the world will have seen and heard the last of older machines like the HR-7100. And as new products come to market, we stand to lose much more than VCRs.

Imagine a world where we never again hear the symphonic startup of a Windows 95 machine. Imagine generations of children unacquainted with the chattering of angels lodged deep within the recesses of an old cathode ray tube TV. And when the entire world has adopted devices with sleek, silent touch interfaces, where will we turn for the sound of fingers striking QWERTY keypads? Tell me that. And tell me: Who will play my GameBoy when I'm gone?

These questions and more led me to the undertaking that is The Museum Of Endangered Sounds.

My ten-year plan is to complete the data collection phase by the year 2015, and spend the next seven years developing the proper markup language to reinterpret the sounds as a binary composition.

If you don't understand my passion and the significance of my work, you probably never will. But if you do, then you've come to the right place.

And please, please email me if you enjoy the museum or have any questions! I love to hear from people and need to know what gadget sounds I am missing.

Thank you! 

Awesome!


Art + Music + Technology Podcast 056: Brian Funk (AfroDJMac)

Photo Nov 30, 3 18 01 PM

Darwin Grosse's latest podcat is up - this time with my Brian Funk (aka AfroDJMac). Listen here http://artmusictech.libsyn.com/podcast-056-brian-funk-afrodjmac.

Brian is known for his prolific work to create amazing racks for Ableton Live. I collaborated with Brian on  the Ableton Rack #40: Zebra Attack and Ableton Rack #40: Zebra Attack II so I was super excited to introduce him to Darwin Grosse so we could all get a behind-the-scenses look into Brian's work. 

My friend Mark Mosher doesn't get adamant too often, but when he does, I have to listen. He was adamant about getting into his friend AfroDJMac, and the work that he's been doing on Ableton Live packs. I jumped into my research (i.e., I took things for a quick drive then started digging deeper), and was really impressed with the work. Reached out to see if he'd be up for a quickie chat, and he jumped on the opportunity.

So you get this - my Thanksgiving gift to you. Great talk with a really insightful programmer, sound designer, songwriter and Ableton Certified Trainer.

I always like when someone opens a door for me to explore. Brian's ideas about vocal music (especially mixed with electronic music concepts) are really unique, and the way that he mixes music and teaching is also very interesting. Listen to his work here, and enjoy the discussion!


Experimental Synth Video on Koushion 4.0 MIDI CC Sequencing with Moog Slim Phatty & Little Phatty

Koushion

My friend Chris Stack over at ExperimentalSynth.com just posted a cool video on his YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/experimentalsynth

Watch Koushion 4.0 MIDI CC Sequencing with Moog Slim Phatty & Little Phatty.  

Some first experiments with sequencing MIDI CC values with the Koushion iPad app. New features in ver 4.0 allowed me to control multiple CC parameters simultaneously while also sequencing notes.


Vintage Synths: Reminiscing About Poly 800 + Moog Slayer Filter Mod + Poly-800 Meets Octatrack Improv

Poly-800-moog-slayer

My First Synth

My very first synth was the Poly-800 which I bought the year it was introduced in 1984. It was the first programmable polyphonic synth for under a thousand bucks (I bought mine for $795 new). It was an incredible value at the time with these features:

  • MIDI  (which had only just been introduced at the 1993 NAMM show)
  • 8 note polyphony
  • Two stable digital oscillators (DCO) but with a 24dB/oct low-pas analog filter
  • Hold, Chord Memory
  • A step Sequencer
  • 49 Full-sized keys (non-velocity sensing)
  • Runs on battery (6 C cells)
  • 3 envelope generators
  • Chorus
  • Noise
  • Strap pegs so you could wear it like a keytar
  • A joystick to control pitch bend and modulation and the filter

Continue reading "Vintage Synths: Reminiscing About Poly 800 + Moog Slayer Filter Mod + Poly-800 Meets Octatrack Improv" »


Documentary: "What the Future Sounded Like" (Musique concrète with Tape/Early Samplers, Dr. Who, EMS VC3, Digital PDP-8s, LSD and More...)

  What the future sounded like

Here is a fascinating documentary released in 2006.The entire 27 minute video is available on Vimeo https://vimeo.com/70164353 or you can watch it in the embedded player below.

It's defintely worth your time if you've never seen it - so bookmark for later if you don't have time to watch it now. Some nice Dr. Who action at 6:46. Also, fascinating info on an early seqeuncer built with a Digital Equipment Coporation PDP-8 at the 10:32 mark.

 

What The Future Sounded Like from Closer Productions on Vimeo.

Synopsis

Post-war Britain rebuilt itself on a wave of scientific and industrial breakthroughs that culminated in the cultural revolution of the 1960’s. It was a period of sweeping change and experimentation where art and culture participated in and reflected the wider social changes. In this atmosphere was born the Electronic Music Studios (EMS), a radical group of avant-garde electronic musicians who utilized technology and experimentation to compose a futuristic electronic sound-scape for the New Britain. 

Comprising of pioneering electronic musicians Peter Zinovieff and Tristram Cary (famed for his work on the Dr Who series) and genius engineer David Cockerell, EMS’s studio was one of the most advanced computer-music facilities in the world. EMS’s great legacy is the VCS3, Britain’s first synthesizer and rival of the American Moog. The VCS3 changed the sounds of some of the most popular artists of this period including Brian Eno, Hawkwind and Pink Floyd. Almost thirty years on the VCS3 is still used by modern electronic artists like The Emperor Machine. 

What The Future Sounded Like colours in a lost chapter in music history, uncovering a group of composers and innovators who harnessed technology and new ideas to re-imagine the boundaries of music and sound. Features music from Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Roxy Music and The Emperor Machine. 

Check out the official web site for more info http://www.whatthefuturesoundedlike.com/ .

Want an EMS VCS in your rig? Here are some virtual versions:

Mark Mosher 
Electronic Musician, Boulder, CO
 
http://www.markmoshermusic.com 
http://www.aiwinter.net 
http://bouldersynth.com (meetup)

 


Behind-The-Scenes Video: NIN "Echoplex" Live at Rehearsals, July 2008

Here is a little inspiraiton to start your weekend. I've always loved this song and it's pretty great to see it performed in the rehearsal context.

Recorded live at rehearsals in Los Angeles. From a series of performances directed by Rob Sheridan, available on The Slip Limited Edition CD/DVD: http://theslip.nin.com/physical/

http://youtu.be/0hfxwd3zpYo

Mark Mosher 
Electronic Musician, Boulder, CO
 
http://www.markmoshermusic.com 
http://www.aiwinter.net 
http://bouldersynth.com (meetup)


Absynth Sound Design Experiment - Non-Linear Radioactive Soda Can

Radioactive soda can

I recently did a post where I manipulated the sample of the sound of a pen striking a half-full can of soda with Ableton Push and pad pressure. In this post I used the same sample, but this time with Absynth. You can listen to the experiment on Soundcloud here or in the embedded player below.

The recoridng starts with the original sample just to illistrate the starting point. I built an Absynth preset with granular synthesis to manipulate the play head plus grain size. I use the Aetherizer effect to further manipulate the signal with a comb filter with feedback. I achieve non-linearity by setting the sample start envelope to "Loop" which causes the sound to keep re triggering and playing through the grains and filing up the Aetherizer's buffer. When played at certain pitches, this non-linearity feedback results in a Geiger counter-like sound. All that from a coke can strike :^) A play the preset with various notes to show how different the harmonic content is as it feedback at different frequencies.

I've become quite handy with Absynth, so if there is some aspect of Absynth you'd like me to do a post on, leave a comment.
  

Mark Mosher 
Electronic Musician, Boulder, CO
 
http://www.markmoshermusic.com 
http://www.aiwinter.net 
http://bouldersynth.com (meetup)